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Wednesday, February 26, 2020

15 adjectives to describe a place



Alive

full of emotion and excitement:

Bustling

full of busy activity:

Calm

free from stress:

Charming

very pleasing and attractive:

Cosmopolitan

including people from different countries:

Enchanting

very interesting and attractive:

Fascinating

extremely interesting and attractive:

Fresh

new and therefore interesting or exciting:

Homey

pleasant and comfortable like home:

Inspiring

Making you feel you want to do or create something:

Lively

full of life and energy:

Peaceful

Quiet and calm:

Picturesque

(of a place) Attractive in appearance:

Unspoiled

beautiful because it has not been changed by people:

Vibrant

energetic and exciting:

Monday, February 24, 2020

Learn 600 of the Most Important English Nouns



The 600 nouns in this list are part of Charles K. Ogden's compilation of 850 words, which he released in 1930 with the book "Basic English: A General Introduction with Rules and Grammar." This list is an excellent starting point for building up vocabulary to converse fluently in English.

While this list is helpful for a strong beginning, more advanced vocabulary building will help you improve your English.

1. account
2. act
4. adjustment
5. advertisement
6. agreement
7. air
8. amount
9. amusement
10. animal
11. answer
12. apparatus
13. approval
14. argument
15. art
16. attack
17. attempt
18. attention
19. attraction
20. authority
21. back
22. balance
23. base
24. behavior
25. belief
26. birth
27. bit
28. bite
29. blood
30. blow
31. body
32. brass
33. bread
34. breath
35. brother
36. building
37. burn
38. burst
39. business
40. butter
41. canvas
42. care
43. cause
44. chalk
45. chance
46. change
47. cloth
48. coal
49. color
50. comfort
51. committee
52. company
53. comparison
54. competition
55. condition
56. connection
57. control
58. cook
59. copper
60. copy
61. cork
62. copy
63. cough
64. country
65. cover
66. crack
67. credit
68. crime
69. crush
70. cry
71. current
72. curve
73. damage
74. danger
75. daughter
76. day
77. death
78. debt
79. decision
80. degree
81. design
82. desire
83. destruction
84. detail
85. development
86. digestion
87. direction
88. discovery
89. discussion
90. disease
91. disgust
92. distance
93. distribution
94. division
95. doubt
96. drink
97. driving
98. 
dust
99. earth
100. edge
101. education
102. effect
103. end
104. error
105. event
106. example
107. exchange
108. existence
109. expansion
110. experience
111. expert
112. fact
113. fall
114. family
115. father
116. fear
117. feeling
118. fiction
119. field
120. fight
121. fire
122. flame
123. flight
124. flower
125. fold
126. food
127. force
128. form
129. friend
130. front
131. fruit
132. glass
133. gold
134. government
135. grain
136. grass
137. grip
138. group
139. growth
140. guide
141. harbor
142. harmony
143. hate
144. hearing
145. heat
146. help
147. history
148. hole
149. hope
150. hour
151. humor
152. ice
153. idea
154. impulse
155. increase
156. industry
157. ink
158. insect
159. instrument
160. insurance
161. interest
162. invention
163. iron
164. jelly
165. join
166. journey
167. judge
168. jump
169. kick
170. kiss
171. knowledge
172. land
173. language
174. laugh
175. low
176. lead
177. learning
178. leather
179. letter
180. level
181. lift
182. light
183. limit
184. linen
185. liquid
186. list
187. look
188. loss
189. love
190. machine
191. man
192. manager
193. mark
194. market
195. mass
196. 
meal
197. measure
198. meat
199. meeting
200. memory
201. metal
202. middle
203. milk
204. mind
205. mine
206. minute
207. mist
208. money
209. month
210. morning
211. mother
212. motion
213. mountain
214. move
215. music
216. name
217. nation
218. need
219. news
220. night
221. noise
222. note
223. number
224. observation
225. offer
226. oil
227. operation
228. opinion
229. order
230. organization
231. ornament
232. owner
233. page
234. pain
235. paint
236. paper
237. part
238. paste
239. payment
240. peace
241. person
242. place
243. plant
244. play
245. pleasure
246. point
247. poison
248. polish
249. porter
250. position
251. powder
252. power
253. price
254. print
255. process
256. produce
257. profit
258. property
259. prose
260. protest
261. pull
262. punishment
263. purpose
264. push
265. quality
266. question
267. rain
268. range
269. rate
270. ray
271. reaction
272. reading
273. reason
274. record
275. regret
276. relation
277. religion
278. representative
279. request
280. respect
281. rest
282. reward
283. rhythm
284. rice
285. river
286. road
287. roll
288. room
289. rub
290. rule
291. run
292. salt
293. sand
294. scale
295. 
science
296. sea
297. seat
298. secretary
299. selection
300. self
301. sense
302. servant
303. sex
304. shade
305. shake
306. shame
307. shock
308. side
309. sign
310. silk
311. silver
312. sister
313. size
314. sky
315. sleep
316. slip
317. slope
318. smash
319. smell
320. smile
321. smoke
322. sneeze
323. snow
324. soap
325. society
326. son
327. song
328. sort
329. sound
330. soup
331. space
332. stage
333. start
334. statement
335. steam
336. steel
337. step
338. stitch
339. stone
340. stop
341. story
342. stretch
343. structure
344. substance
345. sugar
346. suggestion
347. summer
348. support
349. surprise
350. swim
351. system
352. talk
353. taste
354. tax
355. teaching
356. tendency
357. test
358. theory
359. thing
360. thought
361. thunder
362. time
363. tin
364. top
365. touch
366. trade
367. transport
368. trick
369. trouble
370. turn
371. twist
372. unit
373. use
374. value
375. verse
376. vessel
377. view
378. voice
379. walk
380. war
381. wash
382. waste
383. water
384. wave
385. wax
386. way
387. weather
388. week
389. weight
390. wind
391. wine
392. winter
393. woman
394. wood
395. wool
396. word
397. work
398. wound
399. writing
400. year

Friday, February 21, 2020

Opposite Adjectives

  • Slow – Fast
  • Thick – Thin
  • Straight – Curly
  • Light – Heavy
  • Loose – Tight
  • Beautiful – Ugly
  • Big – Small
  • Strong – Weak
  • Healthy – Sick
  • Low – High
  • Poor – Wealthy
  • Short – Tall
  • Thin – Fat
  • Insane – Sane
  • Bad – Good
  • Straight – Crooked
  • Deep – Shallow
  • Dark – Light
  • Lazy – Hard-working
  • Brave – Cowardly
  • Cheap – Expensive
  • Distant – Near
  • Modern – Ancient
  • Delicious – Awful
  • Wide – Narrow
  • Talkative – Taciturn
  • Healthy – Sick
  • Careful – Careless
  • Pessimistic – Optimistic
  • Tidy – Messy
  • Patient – Impatient
  • Friendly – Unfriendly
  • Cold – Hot
  • Dishonest – Honest
  • Happy – Unhappy
  • Selfish – Generous

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Avoid mistakes using the correct worder

1. Sentences

correct word orderincorrect word ordertip
was shopping in Leipzig.I was in Leipzig shopping.1
He played football yesterday.He played yesterday football .2
Yesterday he played football.
Dan rode his bike carefully.Dan rode carefully his bike.3
He often reads books.He reads often books.4a
He Is always late.He always is late.4b
tipBe careful!detailed explanation
1main verb before placeWord order: subject-verb-object-place-time
2place before expression of timeWord order: subject-verb-object-place-time
3object before adverb of mannerPosition of adverbs
4aadverb of frequency before main verbPosition of adverbs of frequency
4badverb of frequency after form of to bePosition of adverbs of frequency

2. Questions

correct word orderincorrect word ordertip
Do you play football or handball?Play you football or handball?5
When did you see Peggy yesterday?When did you yesterday see Peggy?6
tipBe careful!detailed explanation
5Start the question with the auxiliary do.Questions in the Simple Present
6Put the expression of time (yesterday) at the end of the question. Questions in the Simple Past

Monday, February 17, 2020

50 Most Common Adjectives in English


This list of the 50 most frequently used adjectives in English is a good place to start expanding your English vocabulary. Adjectives add precision to your language skills, but you don't necessarily need to have an enormous collection right from the start. The adjectives in this list are enough to get by with for many simple English tasks.
  1. able
  2. bad
  3. best
  4. better
  5. big
  6. black
  7. certain
  8. clear
  9. different
  10. early
  11. easy
  12. economic
  13. federal
  14. free
  15. full
  16. good
  17. great
  18. hard
  19. high
  20. human
  21. important
  22. international
  23. large
  24. late
  25. little
  26. local
  27. long
  28. low
  29. major
  30. military
  31. national
  32. new
  33. old
  34. only
  35. other
  36. political
  37. possible
  38. public
  39. real
  40. recent
  41. right
  42. small
  43. social
  44. special
  45. strong
  46. sure
  47. true
  48. white
  49. whole
  50. young

Friday, February 14, 2020

History of Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day occurs every February 14. Across the United States and in other places around the world, candy, flowers and gifts are exchanged between loved ones, all in the name of St. Valentine. But who is this mysterious saint and where did these traditions come from? Find out about the history of Valentine’s Day, from the ancient Roman ritual of Lupercalia that welcomed spring to the card-giving customs of Victorian England.

The Legend of St. Valentine

The history of Valentine’s Day–and the story of its patron saint–is shrouded in mystery. We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine’s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. But who was Saint Valentine, and how did he become associated with this ancient rite?

The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Still others insist that it was Saint Valentine of Terni, a bishop, who was the true namesake of the holiday. He, too, was beheaded by Claudius II outside Rome.

Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured. According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine actually sent the first “valentine” greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl–possibly his jailor’s daughter–who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and–most importantly–romantic figure. By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, Valentine would become one of the most popular saints in England and France.
Origins of Valentine’s Day: A Pagan Festival in February

While some believe that Valentine’s Day is celebrated in the middle of February to commemorate the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial–which probably occurred around A.D. 270–others claim that the Christian church may have decided to place St. Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Celebrated at the ides of February, or February 15, Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus.
To begin the festival, members of the Luperci, an order of Roman priests, would gather at a sacred cave where the infants Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were believed to have been cared for by a she-wolf or lupa. The priests would sacrifice a goat, for fertility, and a dog, for purification. They would then strip the goat’s hide into strips, dip them into the sacrificial blood and take to the streets, gently slapping both women and crop fields with the goat hide. Far from being fearful, Roman women welcomed the touch of the hides because it was believed to make them more fertile in the coming year. Later in the day, according to legend, all the young women in the city would place their names in a big urn. The city’s bachelors would each choose a name and become paired for the year with his chosen woman. These matches often ended in marriage.

Valentines Day: A Day of Romance

Lupercalia survived the initial rise of Christianity but was outlawed—as it was deemed “un-Christian”–at the end of the 5th century, when Pope Gelasius declared February 14 St. Valentine’s Day. It was not until much later, however, that the day became definitively associated with love. During the Middle Ages, it was commonly believed in France and England that February 14 was the beginning of birds’ mating season, which added to the idea that the middle of Valentine’s Day should be a day for romance. The English poet Geoffrey Chaucer was the first to record St. Valentine’s Day as a day of romantic celebration in his 1375 poem “Parliament of Foules,” writing, ““For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day / Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.”

Valentine greetings were popular as far back as the Middle Ages, though written Valentine’s didn’t begin to appear until after 1400. The oldest known valentine still in existence today was a poem written in 1415 by Charles, Duke of Orleans, to his wife while he was imprisoned in the Tower of Londonfollowing his capture at the Battle of Agincourt. (The greeting is now part of the manuscript collection of the British Library in London, England.) Several years later, it is believed that King Henry V hired a writer named John Lydgate to compose a valentine note to Catherine of Valois.



Original text from History.com

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

verb 'to be' positve sentences Am - Is - Are - Exercise

1. She  in the house.
2. The dog and the cat  in the garden.
3. The woman  behind a tree.
4. I  Kevin.
5. Carol and I  friends.
6. It  black.
7. My name  Bob.
8. They  nice girls.
9. The children  in the shop.
10. He  a teacher.
11. We  hungry.
12. Mrs Dixon  funny and nice.
13. I  twelve years old.
14. Jim and Cathy  at school.
15. The elephants  tired.



Solutions

1. She  in the house.
2. The dog and the cat  in the garden.
3. The woman  behind a tree.
4. I  Kevin.
5. Carol and I  friends.
6. It  black.
7. My name  Bob.
8. They  nice girls.
9. The children  in the shop.
10. He  a teacher.
11. We  hungry.
12. Mrs Dixon  funny and nice.
13. I  twelve years old.
14. Jim and Cathy  at school.
15. The elephants  tired.

verb 'to be' negative sentences

This is a fun exercise.  Can you write the negative?
0. This is fun.  This isn't fun.



  1. I am hungry.
  2. She is thirsty.
  3. They are friendly.
  4. It is a nice cat. 
  5. They are farmers.
  6. His name is John.
  7. She is a technical salesperson.
  8. They are speaking French.
  9. We're happy.
  10. He is happy with his job.


Solutions
  1. I'm not hungry.
  2. She isn't thirsty.
  3. They aren't friendly.
  4. It isn't a nice cat. 
  5. They aren't farmers.
  6. His name isn't John.
  7. She isn't a technical salesperson.
  8. They aren't speaking French.
  9. We aren't happy.
  10. He isn't happy with his job.

Monday, February 10, 2020

How to use the phrase the Internet correctly


Correct phraseCommon error
I'm on the Internet.I'm in the Internet.
I'm on the Net.
I surf the Internet.I surf in the Internet.
I surf the Net.
You'll find the information on the Internet.You'll find the information in the Internet.
In our hotel all rooms have access to the Internet.In our hotel all rooms have access to Internet.
I use the Internet.I use internet.
You can buy the book over the Internet.You can buy the book in the Internet.
I'm online. 
The word Internet is often written in capital letters.

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